Landlords, Tenants, Renting and Management

Information about renting units

Contributed By: Nick Buick on

Naturally, onsite managers always prefer to sell to an investor, it just makes sense from a business perspective… But more than that, managers know their stock inside-and-out, they literally *live* and breath their listings, unlike a conventional agent. The manager understands how units behave as investment vehicles, and they can do an excellent job explaining all this to a prospective buyer without even thinking about it. It just rolls off the top of their head. They know the condition of the sinking fund, the admin fund, how the committee is performing, the schedule for upgrades, the return potential and current rental demand, and of courseRead More →

Contributed By: Suzette Sutton - Founder, Australian Home Hosting Expo on

The recent trend in home sharing has brought the tourism industry a whole new pool of customers. And they are travelling to non-traditional tourist locations. Looking at the volume of travellers and destinations, (without getting into policy issues), a whole new and separate market has been created by the home sharing economy. Many home hosts around the world are listing their family home – the WHOLE home – for travelers to rent by the night, by the week or longer. Yes, there are a lot of rooms in private homes available on these platforms if you are a solo traveller or a couple, but have you ever tried to travel with 3 (orRead More →

Contributed By: Nick Buick on

Under new rules announced on the weekend by the Andrews government, tenants in Victoria will now access a raft of new rights and liberties at the expense of landlords and managers. Among such new laws, landlords are no longer allowed to solicit for higher bids above the advertised rental price on a listing. Bonds will be shrunk to no more than 4 weeks (which is the same as in QLD). Landlords will also be unable to issue a notice to leave at the conclusion of a lease, without a specific reason. By far the biggest shake-up, however, comes in the form of changes to theRead More →

A few weeks ago we published an article exploring why onsite managers might want to consider jumping on the AirBnB bandwagon. It featured a number of pro-AirBnB comments we’d received from our members, many of which centred around the positive effect it had had on their revenue. But on the other side of the coin, we also received a substantial response from the opposing camp. The picture they painted was far from rosy – in fact the overall impression was that, as this article’s slightly sensational-sounding headline might suggest, AirBnB and strata living might never be able to peacefully coexist. This isn’t to say thatRead More →

Contributed By: TheOnsiteManager.com.au on

It’s been nearly ten years since the launch of AirBnB, and five years since it arrived in Australia. Much like Uber before it, the home-sharing platform’s grand promise to democratise the hotel and holiday rental market has brought with it a lot of problems – especially for hosts’ neighbours, bodies corporate, real estate agents, and of course onsite managers. We decided to explore onsite managers’ sentiment around AirBnB, so we reached out to our members and asked them to share their thoughts and concerns. This article is the first in the series. To kick things off, we looked at the pro-AirBnB side: those who haveRead More →

Contributed By: SSKB on

Water has an incredible ability to find its way into all sorts of strange places.  In community schemes, this can quickly fudge the outlines of who is responsible for water damage.  So who should you be talking to if you suffer water damage?  And what are you responsible for? For owners in a property with a Building Manager, this person should always be your first port of call in a case of water damage, as they will identify responsibility for repairs.  It is important to recognise responsibility is divided between the Owners Corporation or Body Corporate and individual lot owners.  Bodies corporate/owners corporations are generallyRead More →

Unfortunately, in this day and age, it is almost necessary for a Property Manager or leasing consultant to complete a course in self-defence along with their registration. I began asking Property Managers if any have had scary encounters whilst at a tenant’s premises.  Statistically speaking, 1 in 5 had some sort of scare.  I personally, have been pushed against a wall, whilst carrying out an exit inspection, by the outgoing tenant.  This drew me to the conclusion to NEVER agree to conduct the inspection with them present. Routine inspections, if carried out correctly, should be fairly straight forward and the tenant should, in most instances,Read More →

A tragic shooting yesterday left 2 female property managers dead and a third male property manager in hospital in a stable condition. The shooting occurred in a rural property where the managers were understood to be conducting a standard tenancy inspection. The tenant is believed to have opened fire on the property managers at the home killing two and injuring a third. Detective Inspector Dene Begbie of Northland Police said roads around the area were cordoned and the suburb was in lock-down as a major police operation was launched when the gunshots were reported at around 11am local time on Wednesday, July 26th. Responding officers wereRead More →

Contributed By: RealEstate.com.au on

Realestate.com.au recently put together an interesting resource guiding agents on marketing listings on their website. It covers the following points: Photography 76% of consumers on realestate.com.au told us that professional photography helps a listing stand out* Best image first, most frequented rooms next Consider the order of images: Living spaces Kitchen Bathroom Bedrooms Outdoor space Add your market’s lifestyle element. Think location, shopping, entertainment, schooling and transport Don’t skimp on imagery because it’s a rental Reuse professional photos when reletting or selling *Source: Residential Consumer Omnibus, July 2016 Hero Image First impressions count so feature the best image first Drawcard or not, external shots showRead More →

Smoke alarms have a lifespan of just 10 years. Do you know when the smoke alarms in your complex expire? What are the consequences of not replacing expired smoke alarms? As part of our series on smoke alarm compliance for property managers, we will answer these questions. Some smoke alarms do not have an obvious “expiry date”. For example, the smoke alarm (on the left) has a manufacture date of 30th March 2017, hence the replacement of the alarm needs to occur on or before 30th of March 2027. Other alarms are much clearer and state “Replace by X date” or similar. Please note that alarms should be replaced before they expire. If a smokeRead More →